The Ark

For Schools / For Artists

Carclew values the work professional teaching artists undertake in schools and supports artists and teachers to work together to bring vibrant arts experiences to South Australian students.

Arts programs and residencies, in schools support learning and make a difference in the lives of children and young people. To assist teachers and artists to work together Carclew developed an artist resource kit, The Ark. This resource was developed in consultation with artists, educators, schools, arts organisations and companies to include current information about the delivery of lively, relevant and engaging arts experiences that enrich the curriculum.

The Ark provides helpful information and checklists to guide artists and teachers in working together to plan arts activities that support and enrich the curriculum.

The Arts industry and community are essential to a twenty-first century Arts curriculum that seeks to strengthen the opportunities the Arts offer young Australians… The Australian Curriculum for the Arts will facilitate opportunities for young people to engage with professional artists and arts organisations in numerous ways, as appropriate.

The Ark was originally developed and written by Suzanne Donovan (writer) and Helen Bock (Project Manager/Co-writer) in 2006.

Banner image: a group of children in a shed studio with a mentor 

Will your artistic skills, knowledge and experience make a difference to the students, support the curriculum and be valued by the teachers and the school community?

The Artist’s Resource Kit ‘The Ark’ will keep you ‘afloat’ and help you on your way. Developed in consultation with artists, educators, schools, arts organisations and companies, ‘The ark’ documents the elements and procedures that contribute to models of best practice in the delivery of lively, relevant and engaging arts learning experiences.

Initial contact, planning and induction

Now that you have made contact with the school (or they have contacted you), a face-to-face meeting will need to be arranged.

During early discussions you will need to talk about the timeframe (exact dates and times, if possible), your fee, materials, equipment, venue, student numbers and year levels, process and learning outcomes and professional development for teachers.

Now that initial discussions are completed, and you and the school are in agreement the coordinating teacher (with your assistance) will need to timetable and budget the project or activity. A contract may not be necessary but you must have an agreement in writing – this could be an email or a letter.

On the first day of the project / residency you will need to get to know the school. A staff member at the school will take you through a brief induction which should include both basic and more specific information. You will need to know everything from where the toilets are to the school’s behaviour management policy. If you feel you need to know more – ask.

The Survival Skills and Checklist, to follow will help you through the initial process and they include information that will assist everyone to enjoy a safe, stress-free and successful arts experience.

Child Related Employment Screening

Before you go any further one of the most important ‘tools’ for you to have, and an essential requirement when working in schools or with groups of children (under 18 years) is to  have a current Child Related Employment Screening clearance. It is now a requirement of DECD and Carclew that anyone working in schools must apply for any ‘child-related employment’ screening clearance through the Department for Communities and Social Inclusion (DCSI).

NB: if you are working in a Catholic school they also now accept a DCSI Clearance. Please ring the Police Check Unit on 8210 9383 for more information.

Responding to Abuse and Neglect (RAN) or Child Safe Environments Training

It is a requirement for all artists working in South Australian DECD schools to complete a 7-hour DECD-approved RAN course ((formerly known as “Mandatory Notification”). You can book into a course via the CEASA website. There are also a number of other service providers that can be found by doing a search online.

Carclew’s Child Safe Environments Policy can be viewed here.

Organisation and Management of the School/Worksite

School staff will be able to provide information about special events on the school calendar i.e. sports days, swimming carnivals, student-free days, camps and NAPLAN testing. Key dates are often overlooked in the planning stages of arts activities and can have an impact further down the track. It is vital to know this before you confirm dates.

Communication Processes

Is there a weekly staff bulletin or noticeboard in the staff room? How does the school newsletter work? This is often the best way to disseminate information about your arts program to the broader school community. How does information flow between the staff and School Council? How does the Student Representative Council (SRC) give and receive information?

Student Population

Information about the student enrolment and the broader school community are important considerations when planning and delivering an arts program, residency or activity.

This may include:

  • a school context statement (detailing information about the socio-economic circumstances which prevail in the area)
  • information about students with special and/or access needs
  • students, identified as being ‘at risk’
  • ATSI students
  • students from non-English speaking backgrounds
  • religious backgrounds
  • family composition (e.g. single parent families)
  • any particular programs which are provided to assist these students

Parent Participation

How are parents, caregivers and other family members involved in various aspects of the school community? If appropriate, discuss with the school how extended family members can be involved. This is particularly relevant when an artist is working in a regional community.

Work, Health and Safety

It is essential for you to be shown emergency evacuation and invacuation procedures on your first day in a school. It is also important you are aware of basic procedures around responding to an incident or emergency.

N.B. A teacher or other member of the school staff will always be present (refer to DECD Duty of Care policy) and will take the appropriate action, but you still need to be aware of procedures.

Social Justice and Equal Opportunity

You will require information about the school’s sexual and racial harassment grievance procedures. Most schools have an anti-bullying policy – it would be helpful for you to be aware of this.

If you are employed by Carclew you will be required to adhere to Carclew policies and procedures as part of your contract (see under Carclew Policies).

The Project/Activity Brief

What is the task?

You need to make sure that the tasks are clearly stated, understood and agreed upon by everyone involved, and most importantly, manageable and achievable. These things must be discussed at the face-to-face meeting before commencement.

If you are working in a regional school, a planning meeting may not be possible but regular email and phone communication is just as important and will ensure you are ‘on the same page’.

General strategies to achieve the task might include:

  • Skills … this is what you bring to the project.
  • Participation … this is what the students and teachers contribute to the project.
  • Partnership … this is what the teacher/s, students and artists bring to the project … or maybe even parents and members of the wider community.

Focal points or key outcomes might include:

  • Curriculum … learning a new skill.
  • Social … improving the ability of students to work in teams or with partners, taking risks, dealing with social issues.
  • Communication … interpreting thoughts and feelings in a new or different way.
  • Incorporation of creative expertise to shape a project.

Survival Skills

The points below will provide you with some insight into working in a school environment. Even if you have worked as an artist in a school before you may find this information helpful.

  • Criminal History Clearance – essential to get this in process long before you are due to start as there can be long delays in processing through DCSI.
  • Responding to Abuse and Neglect (RAN) – you must show evidence of attending a 7-hour (or update online) course with an expiry date within the currency of the activity.
  • Daily procedures – first thing each day you will need to sign the Visitors’ Book (the school may have a name badge for you to wear). You’ll need to do this each day when you arrive and when you leave. This is an important HS&W procedure in case of an emergency.
  • Getting to know the school – make yourself known to the front office staff. They should be able to help you with most of your questions as they are often the people who know the school best. Most staff wear name badges which will help you get to know who everyone is and what their role is.
  • The Coordinator may like to introduce you to each class group at the beginning of your time in the school. You’ll be surprised how many children will remember your name.
    If you don’t need all of the recess and lunch breaks to get prepared for your next session, you might prefer to take a break outside. This is a great opportunity for students to talk with you and for you to get to know them.
  • Parking – find out if there’s a visitor car parking space (if not, enquire where you can park) or special point for entering the grounds to unload equipment. Be aware of students when driving on school property – especially when reversing.
  • Timetable – adhere to the arranged schedule / timetable as schools operate on blocks of time for each lesson. This is particularly important in secondary schools but may be more flexible in primary schools, by negotiation.
  • Workshop preparation – allow plenty of time to set up for a workshop or a performance and check that there will be someone at the school to provide access at the desired time. Discuss in advance – don’t assume!
  • Navigation – ask for a school map. This will be helpful and assist you with locating classrooms and/or spaces you may be working. Schools can be very complex to find your way around – make sure you orientate yourself before you start as prescious time can be lost if you get lost!
  • Staff facilities – you will be shown where the staff facilities are (staffroom and toilets). If not – ask. It might be wise to bring your own mug/cup for hot drinks during breaks and if you are going to be there for the day bring your lunch.

Checklist

Please feel free to use this Checklist as a starting point for planning a successful arts experience with schools.

  • Planning – Arrange a meeting with the teacher who contacted you regarding working as an artist in their school. Take a copy of your CV and your portfolio as well as your RAN and Police Clearance documentation if you have them.
  • Professional Learning – If you plan to be working in the school for a week, two weeks or more talk to the teacher about the possibility about itegrating a professional learning session (at a staff meeting or on a student-free day) for staff. This is an ideal way for all staff to get to meet you, know what you will be doing with the students and may also equip them with new skills they can integrate into their teaching practice. If there is not an opportunity for this the teacher/s who work most closely with you will learn through hands-on involvement (encourage them to partcipate). Don’t forget to also ask the teachers questions – they will be happy to share information.
  • Appropriate skills – Discuss the skills you have to offer and consider if you’re the right artist for the job.
  • Curriculum – Find out what the curriculum priorities are for the school and how your skills can support learning. Be aware the Australian Curriculum: The Arts is now on the Australian Curriculum website and is gradually being implemented in SA schools.
  • Students – Find out how many students you’ll be working with and what ages they are likely to be. It is vital you are clear about how many students you can reasonably expect to work with at any one time and over the duration of the project. This will vary depending on the activity and desired outcome.
  • Space – Find out what space will be available to you and whether it has what it will be appropriate for the activity. i.e. Do you need a wet area? Can you work outdoors? Do you need a larger space (hall)?
  • Plan – Create a project/activity plan – think about what, who, when, where, why and how? Allow room and time for the students to have input.
  • Artist fees – Talk about the budget and how it will be spent, and ask questions about what, how and when you’ll be paid. Remember to factor preparation and travel time into your fee. If you are working at a regional school you will also need to discuss reimbursement for expenses such as petrol (you may build this into the total fee) and where will you be accommodated (the school should pay for this).
  • Materials and equipment – Make a list of the materials and equipment you need for the project. If the school has agreed to cover the cost it will usually work best if you source them – discuss how you prefer to be reimbursed or if it would suit you better for the school to provide Petty Cash in advance (you will need to keep receipts).
  • Collaboration – Talk about how you and the teacher/s can support each other, including how you like to work with students and what can be done before, during and after the project. Discuss aims and objectives, roles (of teachers and artist), agree on desired outcomes, and build in an ongoing evaluation process.
  • Duty of Care (refer to Carclew’s Child Safe Environments Policy) – Discuss the appropriate procedure for leaving the classroom during a session – this may be required for a number of reasons.
  • Outcomes – Project outcomes may be a short performance, show ‘n’ tell or an exhibition and can be an ideal opportunity for parents and family members to see the children’s work. It doesn’t need to be large in scale but it is important that the children’s (and your) efforts be acknowledged and celebrated.
  • Plan for success – After you have considered and addressed all of the above, it will be time to enjoy working with the students and teachers. The skills and knowledge you bring to the project will be valued by the entire school community. Most artists find working in schools extremely rewarding so enjoy!

Your school has decided to engage a professional artist to work with the students on an arts project or activity. The artist resource kit ‘The ark’ will keep you afloat and help you on your way. Developed in consultation with artists, educators, schools, arts organisations and companies and recently updated, ‘The ark’ documents the elements and procedures that contribute to models of best practice in the delivery of lively, relevant and engaging arts and education experiences for South Australian students.

Finding an artist

When selecting an artist consider whether the skills they have to offer will suit the nature of the project or activity, make a difference to the students and be valued and supported by the teachers and the school community.

Selecting the right artist for a school

Recently we asked teachers ‘how do you gauge the quality/suitability of an artist or company?’ and most responded ‘through peer feedback’. All artists who have worked in schools should be able to provide you with testimonials from schools they have worked in before – please ask them when you make contact. If they are not able to provide written evidence of prior work in schools they will be able to give you contact details from someone you can contact.

Initial contact, planning and induction

Now that you (the school representative) know the artist you want to engage, and you have made initial contact you need to invite them to the school for a face-to-face meeting.

During early negotiations you will need to discuss the following:

  • timeframe
  • artist fee
  • materials
  • equipment
  • venue
  • student numbers and year levels
  • the process
  • expected outcomes

After the initial discussions are completed and the school and the artist are in agreement you will need to timetable (consult with relevant classroom teachers) and budget the project or activity. A contract may not be necessary but the artist must have an agreement in writing – this could be an email or a letter.

On the first day the artist arrives they will need to get to know your school. The process of induction should include basic and more specific information. Artists will need to know everything from where the toilets are to what student behaviour management strategies are in place in your school.

The Survival Skills and Checklist will help you through the initial process and include details you need to know in order to work with professional artists and to ensure everyone enjoys a safe, stress-free and successful arts experience.

Organisation and Management 

When planning the dates for your arts activity you will need to consider dates on the school calendar such as sports day, swimming carnivals, pupil-free days/PD, camps and NAPLAN testing. This is often overlooked in the planning stages and can have implications further down the track if not factored in. It is vital for all involved that you plan well ahead.

Communication Processes

It will assist the artist if they are aware of the school’s communication procedures. Is there a daily / weekly staff bulletin? How does the school newsletter work – this is often the best way to disseminate information about the project to the broader school community. How does information flow between the staff and School Council? How does the Student Representative Council give and receive information?

Student Population

Information about student enrolment and the broader school community is important for you and the artist to consider when planning and delivering an arts project.

Information might include:

  • a school context statement (detailing information about the socio-economic circumstances which prevail in the area)
  • information about students with special needs
  • students, identified as being ‘at risk’
  • Aboriginal students
  • students from non-English speaking backgrounds
  • religious backgrounds
  • family composition (e.g. single parent families)
  • any particular programs which are provided to assist these students

Parent Participation

How are parents and caregivers involved in various aspects of the school community? What expectations are there for parent involvement in special projects? It can be a very positive experience for both the students and their parents (and other family members) if they can share aspects of the project. Consider how this might happen.

Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare

It is essential for the artist to be shown your school’s emergency evacuation and invacuation procedures, on their first day in a school. It is also important they are made aware of basic procedures around responding to an incident or emergency.

Duty of Care

A teacher or other member of the school staff must be present at all times when the artist is working with students. An artist contracted to deliver an arts project or activity cannot take on the school’s Duty of Care.

Social Justice and Equal Opportunity

Artists will require information about the school’s sexual and racial harassment grievance procedures. Ensure your artist is made aware of your school’s anti-bullying policy.

Legal, Compliance and Policy Issues

Government Schools

If you are a teacher in a DECD school and are considering engaging a professional artist to work with your students, relevant policies are listed under DECD Policies on this website.

Independent and Catholic Schools

If you are a teacher in an independent or Catholic school and are considering engaging a professional artist to work with your students, similar relevant policies will be listed at the links below.

Policy information for Independent Schools

Policy information for Catholic Schools

The Project/Activity Brief

What is the task?

Make sure the desired project or activity outcomes are clearly stated, understood and agreed upon and, most importantly manageable and achievable. These things should be discussed at the face-to-face pre-project meeting. If you are from a regional school, this may not be possible but regular email and phone communication is just as important and will ensure you are thinking along the same lines.

General strategies to achieve the task might include:

  • Skills and Knowledge … this is what the artist brings to the project.
  • Participation … this is what the students and teachers contribute to the project.
  • Partnership … this is what the teacher/s, students and artists bring to the project … or maybe even parents and the wider community.

Focal points or key outcomes might include:

  • Curriculum … learning a new skill.
  • Social … improving the ability of students to work in teams or with partners, taking risks, dealing with social issues.
  • Communication … interpreting thoughts and feelings in a new or different way.
  • Incorporation of creative expertise to shape a project.

Remember that the artist will bring their creative expertise to the project, sharing their experience and knowledge. The artist will assist you and your students shape what you want to achieve throughout the creative process – visioning, planning, concept development and design, art-making and outcome.

Survival Skills

The points below will provide you and your school will some insight into working with an artist. Even if your school has engaged an artist in the past, you may find the following points helpful.

  • Take the artist through the ‘sign in’ procedure. They need to be aware that they need to do this each day when they arrive and leave. Ensure they are aware of the importance of this procedure – i.e. emergency, fire.
  • Front office – introduce the artist to the staff in the front office and ask the staff to assist the artist if they need anything such as photocopying.
  • Parking  – talk to your artist about where they can park and be aware they may need to be able to get close to the space they are working in to unload material or equipment. Assist them to do this safely – offer to help them with lifting (or, if you can’t organise another person on staff), assist them to watch out for children while they back their vehicle.
  • School timetable: ensure the artist is aware of the school timetable. When are recess and lunch breaks? This will impact on the length of their workshops and when they can have breaks.
  • Provide the artist with a list of teachers’ names, year levels and numbers of students, and room numbers. Allow the artist ample time to set up for a workshop or a performance and see that someone is there to let them in at the desired time.
  • Provide the artist with a map of the school showing designated areas, room numbers, activity spaces, the hall, the carpark, the staffroom, staff toilets.
  • Staff facilities – show the artist around the school (staff room, toilets). What are arrangements for tea/coffee, cups? Is there somewhere (canteen) where they can get some lunch if they need to?
  • If you are having a special morning tea while the artist is there – please invite them.
  • Introductions – allow enough time on the artist’s first visit to take them around the school to introduce them to teachers, admin staff and students so everyone is aware they will be working in the school.
  • Communication – if you are the coordinator of the project, but the artist is not with you and your students all of the time, make sure they know where to find you and/or who they can go to for assistance if needed.

Checklist

Please feel free to use this Checklist as a starting point for working with an artist to plan a successful arts experience in your school. When you meet with the artist to discuss your arts project or activity make sure you cover the following:

  • Skills and expertise – Before you meet with the artist check that their skills and experience are appropriate for your project or activity. Ask for their CV and talk to them about their past experience working in schools. It is also fine to request testimonials from other schools they have working with.
  • Contacts – Introduce the artist to the appropriate contact person (teacher) who will be coordinating the project/activity and provide contact details. Please consider it is often difficult to contact teachers, due to their busy teaching timetable so you may want to provide a mobile number or personal email.
  • Outcomes – Talk to the artist about the school’s curriculum priorities and why you want to do the project. Explain your expectations and, in particular the desired learning outcomes for both students and teachers (PD).
  • Contract – Negotiate a contract of employment (this can be a simple letter of agreement) with the artist that includes the terms and conditions talked about at the face-to-face meeting. The written agreement should include; the agreed fee, dates and times, numbers and year level/s of students and desired outcomes. The contract should also include a clause on how to deal with a disagreement/dispute (ask Carclew staff for a copy of a standard clause).
  • Negotiating the fee – When negotiating a ‘fee for service’ you will need to allow for preparation time, travel time and cost (particularly if you are in a regional school), and hourly/daily/weekly rate. This will vary depending on the artist, the nature of the work and their experience. Please contact Carclew staff for advice on appropriate rates.
  • Accommodation – If the project is to take place in a regional school and the artist is not local you will need to provide and pay for suitable accommodation. This can be hotel, motel, bed and breakfast or caravan park (cabin). It is important that cooking facilities are available as there is often limited choices in small regional towns especially if the artist has specific dietary needs.
  • Planning – Work with the artist to develop a project or activity plan – think about what, who, when, where, why and how.
  • Professional Learning – If the artist will be in your school for a week, two weeks or more talk to them about the possibility about itegrating a professional learning session (on staff meeting or student free days) for teachers. This is an ideal way, if it happens early in the project for all staff to get to know what the artist will be doing with the students and may also equip them with new skills they can integrate into their teaching practice. If there is not an opportunity for this the teacher/s who work most closely with the artist will learn through hands-on involvement. Don’t forget to ask the artist questions – they will be happy to share information.
  • Materials and equipment – Ask the artist to provide a list of  materials and equipment required for the project. On most occasions the school will be required to cover the cost but it will usually work best if you ask the artist to source them. Discuss how the school will then reimburse the artist or providing Petty Cash in advance (they will need to keep receipts) is sometimes a better option.
  • Space / Venue – Provide an appropriate space for the artist and students to work and organise the booking for the room well in advance. When the artist visits the school show them the possible space/s and check they are suitable for the activity i.e. if it is a dance activity, a hall or gymnasium will be needed and if it’s a visual arts activity, the art room or wet area will be needed.
  • Communication – Consider how the school will inform teachers, students and the school community about the project (newsletter, local media). It is important that the entire school community know about the artist’s visit and what they will be doing.
  • Induction – Provide induction for the artist – this can happen before the project/activity begins. Information to include: signing the visitors’ book; start and finish times; car parking; where things are located in the school; use of phones and other facilities (photocopier); timetables; ordering lunches; school breaks; school rules, policies and procedures; WH&S.
  • Project leadership – A nominated teacher must take responsibility for coordinating the project or activity, including timetables, room bookings, resources, equipment and meetings with artist.
  • Duty of Care – Ensure the artist is aware of the school’s Duty of Care and that every teacher will remain with their students during the duration of the project/activity. An artist must not be left alone with a child or group of children at any time.
  • Planning for success – After you have considered and addressed all of the above points it will be time for the students and teachers to enjoy working with the artist who will be a great asset to the school community.

Knowing about the Curriculum

Understanding and implementing the Australian Curriculum is the responsibility of teachers in schools. Knowing that the skills and knowledge you bring into the school will compliment, enrich and support teachers in the delivery of the curriculum is a real advantage and will help shape your work for implementation in schools.

The arts industry complements the Arts provision for young people in schools, through programs, partnerships and by increasingly providing specialist services for schools, as appropriate. This includes enriching and complementing the curriculum through experiences such as visiting performances, demonstrations and exhibitions, artists in residence teacher professional development and access for students and teachers to specialised facilities in galleries, concert halls, theatres and other arts venues.

The Australian Curriculum

The Australian Curriculum: The Arts (Foundation – Year 10) can be located on the Australian Curriculum website.

In the Australian Curriculum, the Arts is a learning area that draws together related but distinct art forms. While these art forms have close relationships and are often used in interrelated ways, practice in each involves different approaches to practical and critical thinking and reflects distinct bodies of knowledge and understanding.

‘The Arts have the capacity to engage, inspire and enrich all students, exciting the imagination and encouraging them to reach their creative and expressive potential. The five Arts subjects in the Australian Curriculum are Dance, Drama, Media Arts, Music, and Visual Arts. Together they provide opportunities for students to learn how to create, design, represent, communicate and share their imagined and conceptual ideas, emotions, observations and experiences.’ Rationale (introductory passage)

The curriculum document describes: The Arts across Foundation to Yr 10;  Achievement Standards; Diversity of Learners; General Capabilities; Cross-curriculum Priorities; Links to other Learning Areas; and Implications of Implementation. It then details the five Arts subjects across the five bands – Foundation to Year 2, Years 3 and 4, Years 5 and 6, Years 7 and 8, and Years 9 and 10 and includes Content Descriptions and Achievement Standards.

The Arts curriculum recognises the importance of the role of the Arts Industry (artists, arts organisations and companies) in arts education in Australian schools.

Click here to view the Shape of the Australian Curriculum: The Arts (Feb, 2013)

Click here to view the Australian Curriculum: The Arts

The impact on planning / programming an artist’s work

Offering a workshop or project which is integrated across the curriculum and aligned with the Australian Curriculum makes it more relevant to schools and teachers and has the potential to support teachers in the delivery of the curriculum. You might prefer to plan collaboratively with the school to combine the skills you offer with a particular curriculum focus. This style of partnership has significant reciprocal benefits for both artists and teachers.

The Arts Learning Area

The Arts Learning Area incorporates Dance, Drama, Media Arts, Music and Visual Arts and aims to develop in all children:

  • dispositions and capacities to understand and engage in creation/re-creation and presentation/performance in each of the major arts forms of dance, drama, media, music and visual arts; combinations of these arts forms and those that are newly emergent.
  • aesthetic understanding by critically responding to and confidently communicating their analyses of arts works.
  • a contextual perspective for considering and valuing the relationships and interconnections which exist within and across different cultures.
  • an understanding that arts both shape and represent the cultures through which they are expressed, thus contributing to the dynamic nature of personal and group identity.
  • knowledge, understanding and skills in each of the five major arts forms and a capacity to participate actively in constructing new realities and new possibilities through the creation of arts works.
  • capacities to apply arts learning to other Learning Areas, to life in the wider community, to the virtual community, and in accessing further education and training.

Click here to view SACSA – South Australian Curriculum Standards and Accountability Framework 

 

Links to policy documents for both Carclew and the Department for Education and Child Development are available in this resource kit.

You will also find links to policies for Independent and Catholic schools. In addition to departmental policies, all South Australian schools will have their own policies on certain issues and specific strategies that meet the needs of their school community. For example, all South Australian schools are expected to be proactive in the prevention of bullying so most will have an Anti-Bullying Policy in place.

The Department for Education and Child Development’s policies, procedures, guidelines, standards and other educational policy related links relevant to South Australian department schools and preschools can be found, listed in alphabetical order on the DECD website.

Click here to view.

 

Accountability

Curriculum accountability is defined as the professional responsibility of educators, site leaders and state office personnel to:

  • Provide a comprehensive account of the progress and achievement of learners as described in the SACSA Framework (assessment and reporting)
  • Explicitly account for the steps taken to improve the level of achievement within the Outcomes and Curriculum Standards (planning and programming)

Behaviour Management

Behaviour Management refers to the processes schools use to work with students in regard to how to appropriately behave in the classroom, school yard and with each other. Good behaviour management strategies provide opportunities for best practice learning. Many schools develop their own Student Behaviour Management Policies, which can be provided upon request.

Curriculum

The school curriculum refers to the learning pathway that students undertake from Birth to Year 12. The SACSA Framework describes the curriculum Key Ideas and Outcomes all learners can expect their education to be built on. The eight areas of learning described in the SACSA Framework are:

  • Arts
  • Design and Technology
  • English
  • Health and Physical Education
  • Languages
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Society and Environment

Australian Curriculum

In 2008, the Australian education ministers agreed that a national curriculum would play a key role in delivering quality education and committed to the development of
a Foundation to Year 12 national curriculum. The Australian Curriculumhas been developed, initially in the areas of English, mathematics, science and history, to be followed by geography, the arts and languages and the remaining learning areas focusing on economics and business, civics and citizenship, health and physical
education, design and the technologies. The Arts Curriculum is in the process of final approvals and will be on The Australian Curriculum website in the near future.

Duty of Care

Duty of Care is anticipating and avoiding foreseeable harm or minimising harm when it occurs. For example, Duty of Care can involve identifying risks, being careful about physical and emotional safety and knowing what to do when someone has been harmed. A moral duty of care exists when there is no legal duty of care – this is the case for a majority of arts workers.

EALD

English as an Additional Language or Dialect

ESL

English as a Second Language
Some schools will have specialist teachers or courses to assist students whose first language is not English. Many new migrants or refugee students would work in these programs.

“in loco parentis”

This means a person standing in the shoes of a parent, therefore completely on the side of the child. With this phrase the law recognises the parent’s supreme commitment to his or her child. For us … in schools to do anything less than advocate zealously for our children’s rights and safety would be irresponsible and a betrayal of their trust.

LOTE

Languages other than English e.g. Indonesian, Japanese, Chinese, Italian etc…Most schools teach at least one other language some more.

Mandatory Reporting (Child Safe Environments)

The Children’s Protection Act, 1993 obliges departmental staff, contract staff and volunteers to notify Family and Youth Services if they suspect on reasonable grounds that a child has been or is being abused or neglected. There are Child Safe Environments Training courses, which you can participate in if interested. This is also referred to as Child Safe Environments Training.

The Department for Families and Communities’ website also provides helpful information.

NAPLAN – National Assessment Program Literacy and Numeracy

In 2008, the National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) commenced in Australian schools. Every year, all students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 are assessed on the same days using national tests in Reading, Writing, Language Conventions (Spelling, Grammar and Punctuation) and Numeracy.

NIT

Non-instruction time is time allocated to teachers when they are not teaching students. This time is allocated to allow teachers to attend to curriculum planning, lesson preparation, administrative tasks associated with teaching responsibilities, etc. Non-instruction time is provided by another teacher who has expertise in a particular learning area, e.g. LOTE, Visual Arts, Drama, Science.

SACE

South Australian Certificate of Education
The current SACE caters for Year 11 and Year 12 students. The recent curriculum developments associated with the SACSA Framework define the senior years as comprising Years 10 – 12.

SACSA

South Australian Curriculum Standards and Accountability Framework
The SACSA Framework is mandated for all government schools and has been adopted by a number of schools in the Catholic and Independent schooling sectors. In short it is the curriculum for years R – 10.

SCOOTLE

The Schools Online Teaching and Learning Environment
You will find this another useful resource for keeping up-to-date with developments to the Australian Curriculum.

Glossary of DECD Acronyms

As a visitor in a school environment you will find that educators often have conversations that include many acronyms. You will find this glossary, in alphabetical order very useful.

Education

Adelaide College of the Arts

Arts in the Australian Curriculum (NSW)

Association of Independent Schools of SA

Australian Curriculum

Australian Curriculum: The Arts Foundation to Year 10 

Catholic Education SA

The Council of Education Associations of South Australia (CEASA)

CEASA (Member Associations)

Department for Education and Child Development

Early Childhood Organisation Inc. SA

Music SA Online

SACSA – South Australian Curriculum Standards and Accountability Framework

Scootle

Teaching for Effective Learning (TIEL)

South Australian Arts Network

Adelaide Festival

Adelaide Festival Centre – Centre ED

Adelaide Festival Centre – Come Out Children’s Festival

Adelaide Fringe

Adelaide Symphony Orchestra

Cirkidz

Country Arts SA

Community Arts Network (CAN)

Expressway Arts

Helpmann Academy

Musica Viva In Schools

Patch Theatre Company

Restless Dance Theatre

Riverland Youth Theatre

State Theatre Company

Urban Myth Theatre (UMT)

Windmill Theatre

National Arts Network

Australia Council for the Arts – Education

Australian Youth Orchestra

Directions – National Guide to Tertiary Education in the Arts

Foundation for Young Australians

Regional Arts Australia Online

Shows for Schools

Young People and the Arts Australia (YPAA)

Funding

Arts SA

Australia Council for the Arts

Carclew

Country Arts SA

Grantslink

Philanthropy Australia

Other useful links

Department for Communities and Social Inclusion (Police Clearance for working in school)

CEASA (Responding to Abuse and Neglect training)

Bridging the Gap in School Achievement through the Arts – Summary Report (The Song Room)

Guidelines for Teaching Artists – Eric Booth, USA